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I do not yet have a Bolt but I am seriously contemplating getting one. I am retired, the longest trip I normally take is about 45 miles round trip to the casino. I do not have 220 available without putting a new electrical service panel in the house. If I leave the car plugged in to a 15 amp 110vold circuit when not in use for the 100 miles a week I normally drive. I do have Honda Fit I could use for emergency long trips.
thanks
Tickwod
 

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You'll probably be fine. Lots of people believe you NEEDS Level 2, but with modest driving habits I don't believe you do. I average about 15 miles a day, and I only have 110v/20a circuit. I charge as much as I can over night and never have to worry about range. In fact, sometimes I go days without charging and STILL don't have to worry. And if I happen to drive a lot over the weekend, I catch back up after a few days of typical driving and charging when I'm home from work.
 

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Have you driven an electric car very much so far? I'm also retired which means I have lots of time on my hands and it's very frustrating to stay within 300 miles a week which is 15000 miles a year and that is what I have to do on my lease agreement.

It's hard for me to imagine a retired person not wanting to drive an electric car more than a hundred miles a week?

Electricity is far cheaper than fossil fuels, and the fun of driving an electric car is far greater. You can charge 4 miles per hour with 120 volt charging. You can start out charging this way and then go to 220 volt charging later on.
 

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I believe you'll be fine. Especially if you're in San Diego, your usage will be quite mild and you won't need the heater much. I've gone four years with the Spark EV and now a couple of months with the Bolt with just the cord that comes with the car. I actually have a 240 unit, but it's still in the box in the garage. Someday I'll get around to getting it installed, but for now I still just plug in when the battery gets down to half full or when I know I'll take a longer trip the next day.

If you leave the car at the default 8 amp setting, you'll get about 4 miles of range per hour that it's plugged in, so your weekly 100 miles of driving will require 25 or so hours of charging. You could be fine plugging in three nights a week. If you can be sure that there's nothing else on the circuit, you can kick the charge rate up to 12 amps and get closer to 6 miles of range per hour of charging.

And don't forget that you may also be able to take advantage of free public charging at places you already go. The casino I sometimes visit installed some a few months ago, so now I can come home with more charge (and sadly usually less change!) than I had when I left.
 

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I just got one, and use 110 charging. Be aware of some settings:

Hilltop Reserve (which leads to a 90% charge, so there is room to store more from a downhill; default for that is OFF) (I live atop a 750 ft hill, so this is great)

8 amp vs 12 amp. Default for that is 8 amp, and I read that it resets to 8 after next start even after setting it to 12. But now I am trying the Location charging and I think it will learn that when I am home I want 12.

Also today I noticed (was this default? not sure) that it tries to charge according to my next trip time, which it assumes is 7 am the next day. But I never told it any of that. So I reset that stuff to immediate charging, which is what I always want. I am aware that California might have different rates day/night etc for which this might be useful.
 

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Yes, absolutely, 110-volt charging will be sufficient to your needs. When we got our Bolt, our local utility was offering a free charger, but with a two-month waiting list. After using the 110-volt charger while waiting, we haven't noticed any advantage to the 220-volt. It might be nice if we did a long trip, came home and needed to make another long trip the next day, but for what you've described, you'll be fine.

jack viens
 

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If I leave the car plugged in to a 15 amp 110vold circuit when not in use for the 100 miles a week I normally drive.
You can use a 120V/15A circuit with the EVSE ("charge cord") that comes with the car - it will add something like 5 miles of range per hour - so a 12-hour overnight charge would add about 60 miles of range. If you're only driving 100 miles a week then that's going to be way more than adequate, even if you drive all those miles in a single day.

The only risk I see is if you find it so cheap to run and so enjoyable to drive that you end up covering a lot more miles than you expect. :eek:
 

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I successfully charged a Leaf for 3 years using only the 120 volt system except for a few times on the road. A couple of times a faster charge would have been nice. I installed a 240 volt charger 4 months before trading in the Leaf for a Bolt, which may have been a waste of money in my situation (<10,000 miles/year, will probably never travel as much as 200 miles in one day unless it is a long trip away from home, in which case recharging must be done on the road anyway, retired). The L2 was used twice to charge the Bolt and then unplugged since the L1 has plenty of time to recharge the car and perhaps that system is easier on the battery than the L2. By the way the leaf battery showed no degradation over the 3 years using the testing tools available. Location is Midcoast Maine. Loved the Leaf and LOVE! the Bolt.
 

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One way to assess the sufficiency of the 120VAC charging may be through a weekly e-budget. Assuming "charging overnight" means 10 hours each session, you'd be adding 70 hours x 120V x 8 amps (I could never convince kEVin to draw 12 amps), equals to 67.2 kWh, into the piggy bank.

In the worst case scenario the Bolt is said to deliver 3 mi/kWh, which gives you about 200 miles of minimal driving range a week.
 

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I do not yet have a Bolt but I am seriously contemplating getting one. I am retired, the longest trip I normally take is about 45 miles round trip to the casino. I do not have 220 available without putting a new electrical service panel in the house. If I leave the car plugged in to a 15 amp 110vold circuit when not in use for the 100 miles a week I normally drive. I do have Honda Fit I could use for emergency long trips.
thanks
Tickwod
:)Level 1 will work under some circumstances. The Bolt has a large battery pack and
Level 2 is required by most users. For those that can live with Level 1 charging, good. The Bolt is my second 100% EV, and I've never used Level 1.
 

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Another, perhaps miniscule, consideration: I've read that the charging efficiency is greater with the 240V option. So over the lifetime of ownership, you may save some coins.
 

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I agree with everyone else here. Based on the information you provided of driving 100 miles per week. Charging with 110v overnight should be just fine for your whole week. But i must say, when you start driving your bolt EV you are going to want to drive it more often. ;)
 

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I think this calculation is a reasonable rough guide for Level 1 Charging with 120 volts and 12 amps:

Full charge: ~ 200 miles or 60,000 watt hours/(120 volts*12 amps) = 60,000 watt hours/1,440 watts = 41 hours for full charge

Half charge: ~ 100 miles or 30,000 watt hours/1,440 watts = 20.5 hours

Quarter charge: ~ 50 miles or 15,000 watt hours/1,440 watts = 10 hours

Rough Guide: ~ 5 miles (1,500 watt hours) per hour of charge
 

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Charging efficiency - how is it defined?

Another, perhaps miniscule, consideration: I've read that the charging efficiency is greater with the 240V option..
I wonder how charging efficiency is defined? The battery would still be conditioned, causing charging losses, and I wonder if conditioning is affected by the time it takes to charge, temperature of the batteries etc, at the two charging powers (120 volt or 240 volt). I have heard it speculated that charging at 120 volts affects battery lifetime positively, but we don't know much about actual battery lifetime yet. I speculate, but I am not happy about speculating....
 

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Another, perhaps miniscule, consideration: I've read that the charging efficiency is greater with the 240V option. So over the lifetime of ownership, you may save some coins.
Yes you can do this, I did it. It effectively doubles charge rate and halves the charge time. Effectively the charge rate is 2,880 watts
 

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You're going to be fine with 110V charging.

In fact most Bolt owners would be fine with it.

I've charged my Volt on 110V for 3 years now and have 85% of my miles on electric power.

As others have mentioned, even if you went to the casino every day of the week, 45 miles only takes about 11 hours of charging. If you leave at 8am, get home by 9pm, and you'll be full by the next morning.

If I get a Bolt I plan to stick to 110V. I may deplete most of my range on Saturdays when we travel 125 miles round trip, but then I know I will build that up slowly on Sundays (typically 15-20 miles of driving) and weeknights thanks to my 35 mile commute. By the following Saturday I'll be full again. (Probably by the following Tues or Wed in reality.)

You'd have to have a really long daily commute, like 70+ miles, before L2 is truly necessary.
 

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Another, perhaps miniscule, consideration: I've read that the charging efficiency is greater with the 240V option. So over the lifetime of ownership, you may save some coins.
It is more electrically efficient to charge at L2 than L1, however, the difference is around 3%. Since he needs a new service panel, a new circuit run, and an outlet, that will cost far more than he can ever gain back in reduced electricity costs. I am not saying he should not do L2, perhaps for other reasons. Perhaps for that unexpected trip that can pop up at any time. But the reason would not be for reduced electric bills. Based on the usage he describes he won't even save $1 a month.
 

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Hey Tickwood, I'm going to agree with most of the others on this thread and say based on the information you provided, 110v is going to be fine. Depending on where you live, there may also be public L2 or L3 chargers you can always use if something comes up out of the ordinary like needing to drive 200+ miles for 2 days in a row.

Around here almost all Walmarts now offer L2 and L3 chargers, and a number of shopping centers are offering free L2 charging spots. I'm in Southern California, so we're ahead of the curve a bit, but take a look at Plugshare and see what is available wherever you may be.
 

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I just bought my Volt on Saturday night, and came home with only 35 miles of range.
It took until Tuesday morning to be over 200 miles of range.
That is a problem - if you ever get depleted it takes days to top the car back off.
You certainly can try with only 110V initially.
My electrician is coming Friday to install 240V.
 
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