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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know or have any idea if my 2013 Volt Blizzaks might fit my Bolt with stock 17 rims? I know nothing about how these tire numbers actually work on different rims so if someone might have an idea if it is even worth having Costco try and put them on and see if they don't hit a wheel well?--Obviously, I have not asked the fine Costco folks yet and they will be my next call on Monday but I wasn't expecting snow this week and forgot I had the tires in our crawlspace from recently trading in the Volt.

Again, I know extremely little about tires (and would prefer to keep things that way for now) so any help or brainpower you might give would be greatly appreciated...
 

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It is possible to mount these tires on Bolt EV rims, but using the tire size calculator available at https://tiresize.com/calculator you can see that the sidewalls are 10.3% shorter. The overall diameter only amounts to a 3% difference through. The attached chart shows all the dimension differences as well as the expected change in speedometer accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It is possible to mount these tires on Bolt EV rims, but using the tire size calculator available at https://tiresize.com/calculator you can see that the sidewalls are 10.3% shorter. The overall diameter only amounts to a 3% difference through. The attached chart shows all the dimension differences as well as the expected change in speedometer accuracy.
That's an awesome tool and gives me an idea of what these numbers actually mean (I know I was lazy to look it up). Thanks for looking things up. Speedometer accuracy is never much of an issue for me personally based on my habits of driving so I have no concerns there.

Outside of speedo accuracy and maybe a slightly more bumpy ride (?) there shouldn't be any other serious decreases in performance or safety that you can think of? I'd imagine it would lower the car ever so slightly?

Thanks again!
 

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Three areas of concern; all or none are possible:

1. The taller cross-section could rub the inside of the wheelwell at full lock.

2. The taller cross-section could snag the outside fender lip if hitting a bump with wheels turned. I recently saw a Ford/Jaguar with exactly that damage.

3. A member here who used his Bolt on snowy roads mentioned snow packed up under the wheelwells enough to rub on the stock width tires. Taller tires make the problem worse, as there's less operating space.

Go for it and report back ;>)

jack vines
 

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The OEM Bolt tires are 215x50. You propose using 215x55. That would be 10% taller sidewall than stock = 118mm vs. 107. About 11mm mm taller, same nominal width.

Now go to the front of a Bolt and stick your finger in there at the inside top of the tire, where the shock mount takes a dog-leg outward over the tire. Think there is 11mm of extra space in there (assuming that would be OK to have zero clearance)? How about the other clearance areas mentioned above?

Like the man said "Go for it and report back"
:|
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
The OEM Bolt tires are 215x50. You propose using 215x55. That would be 10% taller sidewall than stock = 118mm vs. 107. About 11mm mm taller, same nominal width.

Now go to the front of a Bolt and stick your finger in there at the inside top of the tire, where the shock mount takes a dog-leg outward over the tire. Think there is 11mm of extra space in there (assuming that would be OK to have zero clearance)? How about the other clearance areas mentioned above?

Like the man said "Go for it and report back"
:|
Since it's hard to tell if you are being sarcastic or not, considering I only have one set of rims currently (so switching out all four at once just to have them not work is more painful) do you think it's even worth it considering what you know about the Bolt's tire clearance? Obviously, I am not asking if you know it will work but more if you personally would even try. If you would consider trying, do you have any early indicators of what to watch for before I do something catastrophic? I'm assuming, rubbing, loss of range of motion and skipping during normal operation or bumps would be fairly obvious?

Do you think a good installer would have an idea if things would be ok once a rim was swapped out and mounted to the car with the new tire?

Thanks again for the help.
 

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Do you think a good installer would have an idea if things would be ok once a rim was swapped out and mounted to the car with the new tire?
A good installer would have some idea, but they won't know for sure unless they're really familiar with the suspension dynamics of the car (which is super unlikely). Everything could look alright, but there could be one small part contacting the tire when under load, which you can't see when the car is just sitting there parked. An example of this was a motorcycle I saw (in pictures) that had a slice develop because there was one small part that was occasionally rubbing on the tire. The rider finally noticed and realized the thing was probably really close to blowing out. This was a worst case scenario, but it does illustrate how you can't be completely sure in the situation you're considering.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A good installer would have some idea, but they won't know for sure unless they're really familiar with the suspension dynamics of the car (which is super unlikely). Everything could look alright, but there could be one small part contacting the tire when under load, which you can't see when the car is just sitting there parked. An example of this was a motorcycle I saw (in pictures) that had a slice develop because there was one small part that was occasionally rubbing on the tire. The rider finally noticed and realized the thing was probably really close to blowing out. This was a worst case scenario, but it does illustrate how you can't be completely sure in the situation you're considering.
So would you try it?--Apply as many caveats as you would like, I will be for sure... ;)
 

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Have one installed. Carefully examine the result. Make your choice.

My choice is that while I'd like an extra cm of ride height for snow, I didn't like the clearance issues in front, so I stuck with stock size snows on the stock wheels.
 

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So would you try it?--Apply as many caveats as you would like, I will be for sure... ;)
I wouldn't try it myself, though I wouldn't expect the tire to blow up the first time something on the car contacts the tire (if it happens). If I were to risk the experiment, I'd take a look at the tire every day and take a picture each time, so I could make a visual comparison.
 

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Speaking from experiences on other cars, yes it should work.

However, that extra 1cm of ride height isn't going to do much in terms of snow clearance unless you honestly live in an area that gets hit very hard and have to drive unplowed streets often. Like Buffalo NY. And even then I'm not convinced its worth it.

I would just get the BLIZZAK WS80 in 215/50R17 and be done with it. I hope you weren't considering the Blizzak LM model line if you're serious about max winter grip.
 
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