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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I am new here. I am considering the purchase of a Bolt but needed a question answered to make sure it is the right car for me. I really want to go electric. I did a lot of searching on the net but can't find a clear answer and as owners, I am pretty sure some of you would know.
I go on steep dirt roads with loose gravel sometimes.
My question is if I was going semi slow up a hill and one tire lost complete traction would the Bolt apply the brakes to it and make the other wheel turn that has traction? I know the bolt does not have a limited slip differential but still not sure how the Bolts "differential" works.
Thank you so much for reading my post.
 

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I can't answer your technical question from certain knowledge, but from experience, because the Bolt is all-electric and the one-pedal is so linear, it does better on steep hills and loose gravel than any FWD ICE I've ever driven. Just take it out of "Sport" mode.

jack vines
 

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2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV Premier w/ driver confidence 2 and infotainment packages in Silver Mist
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I am not sure but I think I saw something somewhere about Stability Control.

Lots of cars have a whole host of various software enhanced traction, stability, braking, and even suspension control. As well as driving modes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you.
I think stability control has to do with turning and losing control more then gaining traction while accelerating. But maybe someone here has tested the bolt in a way where one wheel had traction and the other didn't.
 

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Yes! The traction control doubles as a fake diff lock.

Works really well, even when driving really slow, i.e. 1Mph.. Tested several times!

Best


Hello, I am new here. I am considering the purchase of a Bolt but needed a question answered to make sure it is the right car for me. I really want to go electric. I did a lot of searching on the net but can't find a clear answer and as owners, I am pretty sure some of you would know.
I go on steep dirt roads with loose gravel sometimes.
My question is if I was going semi slow up a hill and one tire lost complete traction would the Bolt apply the brakes to it and make the other wheel turn that has traction? I know the bolt does not have a limited slip differential but still not sure how the Bolts "differential" works.
Thank you so much for reading my post.
 

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2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV Premier w/ driver confidence 2 and infotainment packages in Silver Mist
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Thank you.
I think stability control has to do with turning and losing control more then gaining traction while accelerating. But maybe someone here has tested the bolt in a way where one wheel had traction and the other didn't.
I know this much: if you punch it and the pavement is dirty it will light up both wheels not one. You can also creep slower than you can walk. I think it would be good in dirt or gravel but I must confess I have never tried.
 

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Hold your horses. I've never read anything that says the Bolt uses differential braking to act like a limited slip differential. Traction control means when the car senses the front wheels are turning faster than the rear wheels, it reduces power to try to reduce the difference between the two.
Stability control uses selective braking to try to straighten a car that's in a skid.
 
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All I know is that I've driven up a number of steep, gravel roads with no issues in the Bolt EV. There is some slippage (as there is in most vehicles), but it's nothing out of the ordinary. Basically, I'm pretty sure I've driven on roads equivalent to or worse than what the OP is describing in stock tires without any problems.
 

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Hold your horses. I've never read anything that says the Bolt uses differential braking to act like a limited slip differential. Traction control means when the car senses the front wheels are turning faster than the rear wheels, it reduces power to try to reduce the difference between the two.
Stability control uses selective braking to try to straighten a car that's in a skid.
Yes, No, Maybe. Different cars from different manufacturers have combinations of all three. Many use the sensors for the anti-lock brakes to determine if one wheel is spinning faster. If so, the brake is applied to that caliper until it slows to the same speed as the others. Some of the more sophisticated systems on all-wheel-drive cars will use the brakes to keep all wheels rotating at the same speed while reducing the throttle input if the system decides the driver is such a dumb-ass he's making it worse by asking for more power than the tires can apply in a given traction situation.

Stability control also uses steering angle input, but that's for a different discussion.

jack vines
 

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It would be a great test to have one of the Bolts front wheels on a roller and the other on the ground and see if it can get off the roller.
My inclination is to say yes, but I've never tested it on rollers. As I've mentioned, I've been on some pretty gnarly roads without issue, including >20% grades with loose gravel, rocks, and washboard.
 

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Reading this material on the stabilitrak system:

"The StabiliTrak® Stability Control System is an advanced computer controlled system that can help the driver maintain directional control of the vehicle in difficult driving conditions. It uses input from vehicle motion sensors and the steering wheel position to selectively apply any one of the vehicle's brakes and, if necessary, reduce engine power. When the system activates, a Stability Active light or message may turn on. This is normal operation. If the system detects a problem, the Stability Disabled or Service Stability light or message will be displayed. If the light or message remains on, even after pressing the Traction/Stability selector button, your vehicle may require service."

It seems to me that the last line of that blurb implies that the traction control is part of the stabilitrak system, and thus it can apply any brake force needed to keep you moving in the direction you want to go... I may be wrong, but that is how it reads to me :)

Keith
 

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"The StabiliTrak® Stability Control System is an advanced computer controlled system that can help the driver maintain directional control of the vehicle in difficult driving conditions. It uses input from vehicle motion sensors and the steering wheel position to selectively apply any one of the vehicle's brakes and, if necessary, reduce engine power. Keith
Getting a bit OT, but most drivers never learn how to use the built-in safety features. Back when anti-lock brakes were first being offered, insurance companies were offering discounts on cars so equipped; the increased braking performance should reduce accidents, correct?

Turns out, the vast majority of drivers were unsure how to use anti-lock and kept trying to pump the brakes, defeating the design. Those who did learn how to use anti-lock drove faster and braked harder, depending on the system to bail them out. Net result, little reduction in accidents due to anti-lock.

Same with StabiliTrak. For it to function as well as possible, the driver must keep the steering wheel pointed in the direction he wants to go. Once again, most drivers panic and will try to steer themselves out of the problem they got themselves into. Thus, the StabilTrak can't help, because the driver is confusing it by steering into the skid or otherwise giving conflicting inputs.

Corvette was one of the first GMs to get StabiliTrak. A survey found most didn't even know it was there or how to get the out out of it. The few who really loved it admitted to driving harder, because they'd experienced being able to get away with more stupid.

jack vines
 

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When it rains heavily in my area our dirt access road turns into a mud bog. I've gotten in the habit of turning off the traction control. Having to press the accelerator down unnaturally far to keep the car moving is unnerving. Someone on the forum suggested I try it without traction control. That's the ticket. Car has no trouble with the mud and I can control its speed. I don't have any experience with loose gravel and a steep grade, but just guessing it would be like the mud situation.
 

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I can’t talk about slippery gravel but I can share my experience in winter with winter tires on black ice roads. The Traction Control is great and not that intrusive as others. If a wheel spins, it engages and uses the brakes to slow the rotation and help to regain the adherence on the road. It does it by wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I can’t talk about slippery gravel but I can share my experience in winter with winter tires on black ice roads. The Traction Control is great and not that intrusive as others. If a wheel spins, it engages and uses the brakes to slow the rotation and help to regain the adherence on the road. It does it by wheel.
Thank you, I saw your video not long ago while searching ALL internet videos on this subject.
I never found any where someone films the front tires in any loose or slippery situation and noted what happened. The person is always in the car driving. LOL Anyone want to do that? You would be the first. :D
 

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Just made a video demonstrating how good it works... The car is on a really step ramp, with the drivers-side front wheel almost in the air. I believe this is a standard feature (torque transfering) on cars featuring the latest iterations of Bosch's ESP/ABS systems... In our case ABS/ESP gen. 9 .


Hope it helps.

Gauer
 

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Discussion Starter #20
CGauer, Thank you so much for the video!! Much appreciated! This looks great to me. Nothing like an actual demonstration. As far as ground clearance goes, rubber coil spring spacers should do the trick to lift it up an inch or so. I already researched that. I am getting excited for my first EV! Looks like used Premier trim starts at $16,000 in my area, CA. Hard to pass up.

This kind below. Slides into place with soap and water once you jack up the car.
30193

30194
 
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