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With the slow unraveling of the battery recall and the Bolt EV/EUV possibly returning to production next year, will they remain relevant over the next few years? Will the price drop for the 2022+ model years be enough to keep the Bolt EV/EUV on the public's shopping list? With the Kia EV6 and Ioniq 5 coming on the scene and potentially replacing the e-Niro and Kona EV (already gone from Korea), the Bolt EV/EUV will be almost alone in the 200 mile sub-compact space. Will the value proposition be enticing enough? What's everyone's opinion on the future success of the Bolt EV/EUV until 2025 in terms of enticing people to go electric.
 

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Since U.S. doesn't get the ID.3, the Bolt is the only sub-compact BEV with 250+ range, adaptive cruise control, 360 camera, Android Auto & Apple Car Play, actual 1-pedal driving, choices of "colors" not just silver/white/black, etc, etc. It'll do just fine with the folks who want a small EV. How big a market that is may be something else. though.
 

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I think the end of 2022 and more likely, 2023 (since these are always delayed) will bring a lot more competition honestly that the Bolt will not be a first choice for many new car buyers. Maybe I am biased, but does anyone really want an iPhone 8 when the iPhone 13 is out AT, pretty much a simlar price?

Remember, you're buying 2017 tech when you buy a Bolt since it has never been refreshed/updated really. Charging network expanded with Infra bill will make others thing of wanting at least a bit faster charging 'just in case'.

Some strong/better contenders that goes 230+ miles in my mind (I assume GM will raise prices similar to them lowering prices after the credits expired). Remember that the 2022 was $5,500 LESS than the 2021 (probably because they weren't selling):

Fisker Ocean Sport $37k or Ultra $49k
Nissan Ariya $45.9k (personally, not a real fan, range ~300 miles according to website)
Audi Q4 e-tron $43.9k
Kia/Hyundai stuff

Would someone really buy a plain jane/non-luxury new Bolt in the $35k price range (I'm assuming prices go up if credit comes back) when you can get an Audi or the Fisker instead (I assume GM will not be selling these for 20k new if the BBB actually passes.)?

Let's not kid ourselves the Bolt is that great anymore compared to other EVs honestly (yes, it's great vs. any ICE though and I'm an owner too) in 2022 when we're all driving 5+ year old stuff now. In 2017-2020, there was really only Tesla or Bolt, 2022/2023, there will be a lot more options and some people may opt for the trucks coming out like Rivian/F150.
 

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With the slow unraveling of the battery recall and the Bolt EV/EUV possibly returning to production next year, will they remain relevant over the next few years? Will the price drop for the 2022+ model years be enough to keep the Bolt EV/EUV on the public's shopping list? With the Kia EV6 and Ioniq 5 coming on the scene and potentially replacing the e-Niro and Kona EV (already gone from Korea), the Bolt EV/EUV will be almost alone in the 200 mile sub-compact space. Will the value proposition be enticing enough? What's everyone's opinion on the future success of the Bolt EV/EUV until 2025 in terms of enticing people to go electric.
The Bolt's primary draw as an EV was its (relative) affordability. Yes, there are also weirdos like me who prefer small vehicles, but we are apparently a rounding error in the US population. On the affordability front, none of the new EVs look very promising - everything is 40k+ USD, mostly 45k+ USD and with the excuse of 'inflation' that will only go up. I got my Bolt in 2019 for $22k (after rebates) including tax and registration...

The 'good' news is that this seems to be irrelevant to most people in the US who are happy to spend 50k+ on a new vehicle (maybe it's the 84+ month loans?), so I wouldn't expect the Bolt to matter to them one way or the other.
 

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...Would someone really buy a plain jane/non-luxury new Bolt in the $35k price range (I'm assuming prices go up if credit comes back) when you can get an Audi or the Fisker instead (I assume GM will not be selling these for 20k new if the BBB actually passes.)?...
Why do you assume GM will raise prices, but other automakers won't? Are other automakers 501c3 charitable organizations that like to give customers free money?
 

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Why do you assume GM will raise prices, but other automakers won't? Are other automakers 501c3 charitable organizations that like to give customers free money?

Because they lowered the price a lot once the credit expired almost instantly. They lowered again for 2022 models because, I assume, they couldn't sell the Bolts at a $36k MSRP with $0 discount. We all said back in 2019 if you're paying $45k+ for a Bolt, you're doing it wrong. We bought Bolts as a cheaper alternative to Tesla as a small/basic transportation.

It's all about supply/demand. Tesla already raised prices by like 10k on the basic MY, there is still a long wait.

The Bolt was never an extremely popular car no matter how much we may like it. There is also a supply/chip/auto crunch and $5/gallon gas in California making basic transportation high in demand/low in supply.

Time will tell once the stop sale is lifted, but if a $12.5k tax credit is available for a Bolt, my gut tells me GM is leaving $$ on the table and they, like all companies like $$ and will raise prices. GM is not going to want to sell a new Bolt for < $20k out the door is my point.

As for other automakers raising prices, they will if can or are Tesla. Most have MSRP and are priced 'competitively' and you can get most ordered vehicles at MSRP (unless they start raising MSRP as well). The thing is that those other cars are priced much higher than the Bolt if the Bolt had a tax credit so there is little need to raise their prices (since they already get the credit).
 

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The EUV is a hit, and would be much bigger by now if it wasn't for that one '20 fire. The latter showed the burn issue wasn't confined to the '17-'19 models, which we were led to believe. It probably figured big in GM stopping Bolt sales,
which might have taken off. GM has lost a bit of credibility here, and they will have to take some fast steps to regain it before Ford floods the marketplace with the E-Mustang.
 

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What's everyone's opinion on the future success of the Bolt EV/EUV until 2025 in terms of enticing people to go electric.
IMO, virtually nil, small EVs are a niche segment inside of a niche segment. People will want electric versions of what they already like, mid to full size SUVs and trucks. While I really like my Bolt, I'm going to SUV with tow capability or truck, as soon as practicable.
 

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All the new EVs coming to the US are too big.
For you. Nearly everyone has a different opinion.
Scientist are calling climate change an existential threat.
To get more funding, of course. Not that it doesn't exist, but the funding is the reason for the existential rhetoric.
Our response is to buy electric SUVs.
People want safety and comfort. I don't blame people for wanting this.
I am not at all surprised, but deeply saddened.
That's on you. We choose how things affect ourselves.
Our grandchildren will rightly hate us. Blah, blah, blah.
As every new generation does for one reason or another. They'll do this while they drive their electric cars and use their electronic devices that the current generation developed and they will likely be powering it all with a clean energy source that we also developed. Blah, blah, blah.

P.S. Bolt will be as relevant as the Volt in a few years.
 

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...As for other automakers raising prices, they will if can or are Tesla. Most have MSRP and are priced 'competitively' and you can get most ordered vehicles at MSRP (unless they start raising MSRP as well). The thing is that those other cars are priced much higher than the Bolt if the Bolt had a tax credit so there is little need to raise their prices (since they already get the credit).
I agree that I expect GM to raise prices. I disagree that other automakers will maintain their MSRP if the effective price of the Bolt (after tax credit) rises.

If the Bolt and other EVs are in competition with each other, as you suggest, then the relatively pricing of each option matters. So Fisker, Nissan, Audi, and Kia / Hyundai set their pricing based on one of their competitors (GM) having an EV at $31k. If that EV is no longer effectively $31k, then Fisker, Nissan, Audi, and Kia / Hyundai can also raise prices and still attract as many customers away from GM as before - why wouldn't they do that?

Or, are you suggesting that the Bolt is not a substitution for Fisker, Nissan, Audi, and Kia / Hyundai EVs? If that's the case, then changes in price for the Bolt would not have any effect on prices for Fisker, Nissan, Audi, and Kia / Hyundai, but also would not have any effect on purchasing decisions for those vehicles.

Or, are you suggesting that GM will raise the MSRP by the amount of the tax credit, but no more? If so, then the effective price of the Bolt still remains $31k (because the tax credit as currently defined by the proposed legislation would effectively be applied at the point of sale), and nothing changes there either.
 

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I agree that I expect GM to raise prices. I disagree that other automakers will maintain their MSRP if the effective price of the Bolt (after tax credit) rises.

If the Bolt and other EVs are in competition with each other, as you suggest, then the relatively pricing of each option matters. So Fisker, Nissan, Audi, and Kia / Hyundai set their pricing based on one of their competitors (GM) having an EV at $31k. If that EV is no longer effectively $31k, then Fisker, Nissan, Audi, and Kia / Hyundai can also raise prices and still attract as many customers away from GM as before - why wouldn't they do that?

Or, are you suggesting that the Bolt is not a substitution for Fisker, Nissan, Audi, and Kia / Hyundai EVs? If that's the case, then changes in price for the Bolt would not have any effect on prices for Fisker, Nissan, Audi, and Kia / Hyundai, but also would not have any effect on purchasing decisions for those vehicles.

Or, are you suggesting that GM will raise the MSRP by the amount of the tax credit, but no more? If so, then the effective price of the Bolt still remains $31k (because the tax credit as currently defined by the proposed legislation would effectively be applied at the point of sale), and nothing changes there either.

It's harder for other automakers to jack up prices because the credit isn't as massively affecting as GM. GM has $0 fed credit now, $12.5k if the law passes. Other automakers all assume $7.5k already and priced their MSRP based on that.

Everything is in competition with each other. A lot of folks here that already got buybacks done already or in process moved on to other EVs (ID4, Tesla, Mach-E, etc...) already. Some are doing swaps, but who knows when that will be done with the freeze.

My point is other cars are already more than the Bolt, but most people would say it offers more car vs. a Bolt and they priced it based on the market.

If the 12.5k credit passes, my simple

TL: DR is:
I don't think folks are going to be buying a Bolt for < $20k with a tax credit.

If the price is raised to 35k-40k, then with credit, it's back to 25k-30k, then now, you are at comparable prices to other stuff. The Fisker Sport will be ~$27k in CA after tax credits. The Audi, like ~36k for a more 'premium' brand with 2022 tech. I don't even know what we are debating, I'm just saying my TL: DR above.
 
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