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I have been unable to drive my Bolt to work most of the winter - 145 mile round trip. Chevy failed to report that there is a stunning loss of range once the temperatures drop below about 32 degrees.

I just started driving my Bolt again two weeks ago, and we had a late season, nine-inch snow storm on Saturday. The factory tires are horrible in snow and icy conditions. Multiple times, I had to back up and run again at the slight slope of my driveway and, also, on the slope of a loading dock I had to use to unload some equipment.

The factor tires are wonderful on dry curves in the summer, but, in addition to the snow problems, they spin on wet pavement with slight acceleration.

Chevy failed with their choice of tires in my humble opinion.
 

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I have been unable to drive my Bolt to work most of the winter - 145 mile round trip. Chevy failed to report that there is a stunning loss of range once the temperatures drop below about 32 degrees.

I just started driving my Bolt again two weeks ago, and we had a late season, nine-inch snow storm on Saturday. The factory tires are horrible in snow and icy conditions. Multiple times, I had to back up and run again at the slight slope of my driveway and, also, on the slope of a loading dock I had to use to unload some equipment.

The factor tires are wonderful on dry curves in the summer, but, in addition to the snow problems, they spin on wet pavement with slight acceleration.

Chevy failed with their choice of tires in my humble opinion.
LRR tires + snow = sad times. Sounds like winter tires should be on the shopping list this year.
 

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Yep; we had a few very cold days in January, and my lowest efficiency was 2.40 mi/kWh, which translates into 144 mi/charge. I think if you precondition the battery, while connected to the charger, the figures would be better.

As for traction, IDK. I drove in snow once or twice and I didn't notice many problems.
 

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Your experience sounds about right - winter tires are a must if you have real winter. Highway at -20C, I did ~ 240 km on a single charge (about 149 miles), but your traffic/conditions might vary. You'd definitely want to pre-heat while plugged in to a level 2 charger to maximize your range. Oh - and make sure your tire pressure stays correct in the cold. Do you have the opportunity to charge at work?
 

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That is a long commute even for summer, meaning that at some point during the day you will have to charge the car to come back home. I hope you have the opportunity to charge it at work.
 

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And yes - I noticed for winter I automatically lost 62 miles. So I made my calculations based on reconditioning at home minus 62 miles.
 

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Winter driving update from Montana

A couple shots from the winter in Montana. I'm in Butte at the Continental Divide. I found the Bolt (Winterbolt) to be a very competent winter driver. With winter tires! I put Blizzaks on it and being a nordic skier used it virtually every day to go XC skiing at Homestake Lodge. So, in addition to whatever the road conditions were in town, I was driving 10 km of snowpacked roads every day. As you can see in the picture on the road I was looking at range in the 200 mile range. During our coldest stretch in mid-late February I was charging and preconditioning every night as temperatures were well below zero overnight and daytime highs were struggling to get out of single digits. The longest trip I made was back and forth to Helena, 140 miles all told, and ended up with 60 miles to spare. Temperatures were in the 20s. I was relying on the heated steering wheel and seats and recirculation, in fact running the heat/defrost rarely all winter.
That being said, in the past week, roads have been in full spring break-up mode and I had to park the Bolt for a bit as the road to Homestake was a mix of mud, snow,ice and slush and getting stuck in a FWD vehicle was a distinct possibility and that would have been a real pain as I don't see any obvious points to attach a tow cable to pull a stuck Bolt out.
 

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A 145 mile round trip should be easy to do with your Bolt in the winter, even with the heater on. I've put many more than 145 miles on mine at temperatures in the teens and twenties Fahrenheit. Perhaps you are not charging the battery fully? Maybe have hilltop mode on? Even charging with hilltop on, you should be able to do more than 145 miles. Something is not right with your car. Have you checked with your dealer about this?
 

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40-50% range reduction in winter is not too far outside of "normal". Particularly if the driver treats it like other cars they have owned (driving style, heat use, etc.). If they park outside and don't precondition, those factors will also contribute to range loss in winter.

And often people report "range loss" based solely on the guess-o-meter and not from actual usage on long(er) trips. A series of short trips in the cold is vastly more inefficient than a single long one (the car and battery cool between uses and energy is used multiple times to heat them), and the predicted range will be impacted. 100 miles in a single run will use much less battery than 100 miles done 15 miles at a time. The OP may have been able to make his 145 mile commute - or indeed the range could have been insufficient for his circumstances. Not enough info in his post to know for sure.
 

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A couple shots from the winter in Montana. I'm in Butte at the Continental Divide. I found the Bolt (Winterbolt) to be a very competent winter driver. With winter tires! I put Blizzaks on it and being a nordic skier used it virtually every day to go XC skiing at Homestake Lodge. So, in addition to whatever the road conditions were in town, I was driving 10 km of snowpacked roads every day. As you can see in the picture on the road I was looking at range in the 200 mile range. During our coldest stretch in mid-late February I was charging and preconditioning every night as temperatures were well below zero overnight and daytime highs were struggling to get out of single digits. The longest trip I made was back and forth to Helena, 140 miles all told, and ended up with 60 miles to spare. Temperatures were in the 20s. I was relying on the heated steering wheel and seats and recirculation, in fact running the heat/defrost rarely all winter.
That being said, in the past week, roads have been in full spring break-up mode and I had to park the Bolt for a bit as the road to Homestake was a mix of mud, snow,ice and slush and getting stuck in a FWD vehicle was a distinct possibility and that would have been a real pain as I don't see any obvious points to attach a tow cable to pull a stuck Bolt out.

Having slid at 4 mph off an icy road and into a ditch, I was winched out using the provided eyebolt. There are popouts if front and back. You need a thin flat-blade screwdriver or short pocketknife. Be careful to not break off a plastic tab. A rubber/plastic band holds the cover to the car. It will not come completely off. The strong bolt screws in with reverse threading - righty loosey, lefty tighty. The tow operator was very careful, knowing the battery pack was the bottom of the car. I escaped with no damage and no injuries. Do not try to fasten a tow cable to an axle or undercarriage point.
 

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I have been unable to drive my Bolt to work most of the winter - 145 mile round trip. Chevy failed to report that there is a stunning loss of range once the temperatures drop below about 32 degrees.
Did you at least do any research on the Bolt before you pulled the trigger? If your previous car was a gasoline ICE (Internal Combustion Engine), it would behoove you to spend some time getting to know the pros/cons of living with a pure EV (electric vehicle).

If you had just read through the Bolt forums, you might've caught a few other users complaining about their winter range.
 
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...people report "range loss" based solely on the guess-o-meter and not from actual usage on long(er) trips. A series of short trips in the cold is vastly more inefficient than a single long one (the car and battery cool between uses and energy is used multiple times to heat them), and the predicted range will be impacted. 100 miles in a single run will use much less battery than 100 miles done 15 miles at a time. The OP may have been able to make his 145 mile commute - or indeed the range could have been insufficient for his circumstances. Not enough info in his post to know for sure.
If he's really commuting around 70+ miles in each direction then he's going to loose less range than the people running around the neighborhood. Unless there are other factors at play like elevation changes, stop-and-go traffic, high speeds in strong headwinds or a lead foot, I'd be surprised if he couldn't make the 145 miles. But of course those "other factors" can make all the difference.
 
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