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Just read this on phys.org and this may pave the way for the ultimate car battery. Still a long way to go before it's available in electric vehicles but scientists have developed a working lithium-oxygen battery with very high energy density.

I theory, this would allow an electric vehicle in the current market to drive London to Edinburgh on a single charge with a battery that is a a fifth of the cost and weight of a current one.

Imagine this going into production? Or an electric battery in the current size but could travel 5 times farther?
 

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If we can put that battery into the Bolt EV and have it take up the same amount of space that would mean it could travel 1000miles! :eek:

Doesn't sound possible.
 

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I read that BMW is doing really well with its battery development and research. I like how the R&D chief gives what seems to be an optimistic but realistic idea of what the future holds.

The R&D chief acknowledges that the pace of development for electric cars may be slower than some regulators and customers want, but he says that progress has to follow a certain timeline. Engineering an internal combustion engine for its best performance can take “10 to 20 loops”. A model such as the 7 Series plug-in hybrid is on its third loop, with work on the fifth generation engine system destined for launch in 2020 only just beginning. “We have to go through these loops until we have robustness; until we have costs under control,” explains Fröhlich.

He says that battery costs will not decline as much as some people predict. What will change is that power density will increase. That doesn’t necessarily mean that longer and longer range EVs are in the offing, however. Instead, higher power density means a manufacturer can use fewer batteries to achieve the same range parameters as today’s cars. Fewer batteries mean less weight for better handling and lower vehicle prices. Since most drivers only drive 50 – 60 miles a day, on average, car makers are better off making lighter, less expensive cars than heavy, expensive cars that can go many hundreds of miles on a single charge.

“For bigger cars, such as the X5 or X7, in environments where you need more range, a combination with a fuel cell is a good solution. I think we have to be smart on how we use electricity. If you try too much, too early, you don’t have a good car. Even if the acceleration on a straight may be good, 2.5 tons is 2.5 tons.”

When it comes to battery technology, Froehlich says BMW has recently created a uniform design specification for all battery cells now and in the future. “We have defined a certain cell standard millimeter height so that we can build new batteries in 50 years that have the same cell standard, even if the chemistry and energy density will be very different. This means that, when your car fails after 15 years and you go to a BMW shop to have a new battery fitted, you can do so.” That’s smart thinking.
The rest of the article is pretty cool too. It talks about the future of digital technology as well.

http://gas2.org/2015/11/02/bmw-rd-chief-looks-far-down-the-road/
 

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Maybe by the time these dense batteries can go into production for electric cars they would have streamlined the productions process to reduce costs.
Courtesy of Wikipedia.
In 2010, scientists at Technical University of Denmark paid $10,000 for a certified EV battery with 25kWh capacity, with no rebates or overprice.[18] Two out of 15 battery producers could supply the necessary technical documents about quality and fire safety.[19] Estimated time was 10 years before battery price comes down to 1/3.[18] However, costs came down more rapidly than estimated, and by 2015, market leaders Tesla and Nissan had battery costs below $300/kWh, with costs decreasing at about 8% per annum.
Good new for us if they can improve batteries while reducing costs.
 

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but at what extra costs?
This is where he addressed costs...

He says that battery costs will not decline as much as some people predict. What will change is that power density will increase. That doesn’t necessarily mean that longer and longer range EVs are in the offing, however. Instead, higher power density means a manufacturer can use fewer batteries to achieve the same range parameters as today’s cars. Fewer batteries mean less weight for better handling and lower vehicle prices. Since most drivers only drive 50 – 60 miles a day, on average, car makers are better off making lighter, less expensive cars than heavy, expensive cars that can go many hundreds of miles on a single charge.
It sounds like the cost will stabilize. Maybe not as much a reduction as we'd like, but the thing is, the batteries won't get cheaper. They will get better, and therefore we will have to use less of them. That will also make the car lighter.
 

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Reduction in the battery weight would still improve the range of travel on one charge. Still good news even if the price of the battery itself doesn't go down.
 

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I think that for a long time EVs have been very much an in development type of product. I think we are just now getting into more mass market EVs. In just a few years, EVs will be much more of a thing than they are now. I am already seeing more of them around town to be honest, and they aren't all Teslas.
 
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