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Would you buy a new Bolt?

  • Yes

    Votes: 67 61.5%
  • No

    Votes: 24 22.0%
  • Maybe, if they commit to replacing all bad batteries in current vehicles, then I'd have some faith

    Votes: 18 16.5%
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Convenience. I used to think the same way, but my Internet access has become about 90% iPhone now ... and I’m only using a 6s-sized device (soon to be 8-sized device) ... so not one of those “monster” phones.

As for buying a Bolt, I lined everything up to purchase a 2020 (and then a 2021), but then cooled my heels on the idea partly due to the fire issue, but mostly due to the charging speed.
I use my iPhone X for everything these days. Since I retired I have zero need for a lap or desktop. My Macmini is a ‘10 and can’t support jackshite at this point in time so is basically a typewriter and paperweight LOL
 

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Part 583 American Automobile Labeling Act Reports | NHTSA says it is an estimate or projection, not based on prior year. For the 2020 year model, if the battery is made in the USA, the battery alone would exceed the labelled 24%...
1. It's possible for there to be an error on the Monroney sticker. See this example from the Nissan Leaf.

2. The Monroney sticker information has to be provided in advance, before the model year begins, and can exclude changes in sources if those changes are not finalized and documented in time for the submission.

3. The calculation of foreign parts content considers the source and value of the materials used, not just the location of manufacture. Using the Nissan Leaf as an example, the battery cells were manufactured in Smyrna, TN, but the electrode film material was still imported from Japan. Thus, even with "US" manufacturing of the battery cells, almost all the value of the battery was still from Japan.
 

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y
Or is the name tarnished beyond hope at this point.
I know GM said the mid 2020, 2021 and theoretically 2022 are not effected because batteries changed? Changed what, just the assembly? Components? Will we ever know? If they 'changed' something, does that mean they new exactly what to change to avoid issues?
So many questions, so few answers.
Yes, we bought a new 2021 Premiere a few days before we got the buyback check for our 2017. So for a week we had two Bolts!
Chevy did right by us as far as we’re concerned(because we are in a Lemon Law state).
Seems like same features, if available, are more costly in the 2022’s?
I think with their “All Electric” announcement, they’d better treat all current EV customers very, very well, or suffer a reputational hit like our former relationship with Nissan.
 

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I say maybe (answered yes) only because the EV landscape has changed. In 2017 it was a no brainer and basically the only game in town at that range and price. It's still fundamentally a decent car. If I were in the market today it would definitely make my top 3 list. My one wish would be for a tow rating - just for a small utility trailer - that would make it a no brainer for me again.
 

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It will be interesting to see how GM spins "battery fire" when their new Ultium battery hits the showroom floors and how they are super safe and have state of the art software to prevent fires, which we know is BS.
 

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It will be interesting to see how GM spins "battery fire" when their new Ultium battery hits the showroom floors and how they are super safe and have state of the art software to prevent fires, which we know is BS.
That sounds like a jaded customer. Is it too late for GM to restore your confidence?
 

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One thing that’s overlooked in a lot of the panic is the question of “Why did GM move the battery manufacturing from South Korea to the US in the first place?”

Because it’s likely that it’s more expensive to manufacture them in the US than in South Korea, so it wasn’t for financial reasons. In fact, moving all the tooling, training new employees, and so on, must have been quite expensive.

That means it‘s likely for functional reasons, such as greater reliability and/or reducing the risk of problems. They very likely knew something was not right about the packs being produced in SK — enough to move the entire battery production to the US.

While this sucks for those who bought in early, it also gives me confidence that they recognized a problem with the earlier packs and acted to fix it, long before the fires became an issue (i.e. around early 2019).

Even though their behavior about the fires has not been forthcoming, I think they know (or at least strongly suspect) what the issue is. My best guess is that the waffling from GM happening now is the bean counters looking at a huge bill to do buybacks or battery replacements, and figuring out how to try to minimize the impact of that. We can only hope they do the right thing… but even if they don’t, that doesn’t change the fact that they likely recognized the problem and acted to fix it in 2019.
The LG plant in Holland, Mi had been making Volt batteries. Since the Volt was discontinued, it made sense to build the Bolt batteries there.
 

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I would not buy another Bolt, but my reason does not have to do with the fires. My Bolt has 97K miles on it and has not burned yet, so not likely to have a manufacturing defect.

My reasons for not wanting another one are range and charging speed. Since I bought the Bolt back in 2017, technology has advanced and range is up as well as charging speeds. But the new Bolts have not advanced at all.(n) I just bought a Mach E with 305 mile range and a decent charge rate out to 80%. On my first road trip I was able to add 161 miles of range in 25 minutes, peak charging rate was 160KW and it stayed above 80KW until 80% SoC.(y)
 

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It will be interesting to see how GM spins "battery fire" when their new Ultium battery hits the showroom floors and how they are super safe and have state of the art software to prevent fires, which we know is BS.
I know how you feel. It would have been exceedingly stupid to build a car without a high level of respect for the safety of a known hazard. One would think that GM/LG somehow had these various failure modes of Lithium Ion batteries covered. It's quite perplexing that this is apparently not the case.

I am starting to question the whole concept. So many of the different designs look like basic copies of the Bolt battery. Tesla is the major exception since it uses different technology. The Ford Mach e looks a lot like the Bolt and uses LG batteries made in Poland apparently.

At any rate, I'm sort of surprised that there is not any obvious fire protection apparent in the construction of any of the packs. I'm not sure it's right that they should even have the capability to burn up the car. I think the NHTSA needs to look into this before we get much further into the evolution of EV's.

Personally I am leaning toward desiring a much safer longer life car such as one that used LiFePO4 batteries. It would be worse for long distance range but I'm not sure EV's will ever solve that issue well. The Bolt is a super great daily driver. I would never want to give up those virtues. If it had a virtually guaranteed long and care free lifespan, it would be perfect. Just my 2 cents worth.

Maybe GM should develop a LiFePO4 replacement pack?
 

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That sounds like a jaded customer. Is it too late for GM to restore your confidence?
Yes, I believe so. I can't even say the 2020-2022 models are safe with Michigan packs. They might just have fewer miles and charging cycles on them to be affected yet since the software monitoring doesn't work and misses the edge cases. I sure would not buy something with the first year or two of their new gigafactories production while they dial in their processes. Really, at this time I don't trust anything but a Leaf, sad to say. For now I'm stuck waiting to see how this evolves. The Bolt is my first American car in over 35 years because I figured it isn't ICE and even they couldn't screw it up since I'm a fan of LG too. Unfortunately the Japanese brands are so far behind they may not survive but if I can get a fresh pack for my 2017 I'll keep it ten years and then see how battery tech changes. Otherwise, maybe a Honda Insight or something half-ICE.
 

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Mine is a 2020 Premier, manufactured 11/2019. Is there anyway of knowing if my battery pack is Korean made or USA made.
There is a label on the back of the battery. You or a youngster with a flashlight can read the numbers. The professor from Weber State has many Bolt videos and he explained what he thinks is the code for Korea made and US made
 

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I love my 2020 Bolt Premier and would buy it again today. I got a great price on it in January and have been very impressed with the way it drives. I bought it as an inexpensive reliable car. Have not done only trips with it other than a 200 mile drive. Have never charged it on a DCFC but can if I want to. Was near Sarasota last week at the beach and went by and looked at the new Bolt EV and EUV. I was amazed that I had a hard time telling them apart when viewed from the side. I prefer the interior of mine and the front styling. Rear is maybe better but not a big difference IMO. I like the way the Bolt looks like just another compact car and doesn't stand out as an EV. A lot of folks do get to see the back of it leaving traffic lights though :) it's a fun sporty car to drive. It's not perfect but nothing is.

I'm not concerned about my Bolt catching on fire but realize it has a probability that is greater than 0. But then again I have a lot of other things in my house that potentially could catch on fire. What is the probability of an incorrectly installed or faulty 3rd party charger catching on fire? That is also greater than 0. Since all the fires have been with Bolts that have Korean battery packs I take comfort in that. Will be a long time before the number are in but 0 US manufactured battery pack fires at this point is a good sign. Also have to point out GM changed the cell chemistry when production was moved to the US. They have also been dealing with smaller battery packs in the Volt for a number of years so this is not their first EV, just their first pure EV - well maybe 2nd if you cont the Spark EV which I think of as more of a proof of concept vehicle rather than the Bolt.

As for my next new vehicle may be the new Ford Maverick to replace my van which is the current trip vehicle. My kids say no but that's because they like to borrow the van to move stuff.
 

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Or is the name tarnished beyond hope at this point.
I know GM said the mid 2020, 2021 and theoretically 2022 are not effected because batteries changed? Changed what, just the assembly? Components? Will we ever know? If they 'changed' something, does that mean they new exactly what to change to avoid issues?
So many questions, so few answers.
Even though GM seems to have the battery issue resolved for 2020 and above their foresight into EV technology is seriously lacking. They’ve had the Bolt EV out for 5 years and VERY little has changed. The rate of charge is dismal compared to Tesla. And of course I am going to compare any EV against Tesla as IMHO it’s the Gold Standard. Tesla now can charge at 250kW. Amazing!
They didn’t fix the battery issue and I have not received any notice as to reducing charge back to 90% or anything else to tell me they are looking into it.
Of course ICE cars have caught fire. Normally though they are running. If they are running then the owner is nearby. Not sure how many ICE owners park their vehicles in their garages and leave them running. The point is my car is plugged in and charging while I sleep. I have a garage to protect my car from the weather and to keep it warmer for state of charge. If I want to feel comfortable I need to park outside if I want to charge to 100%.
Next vehicle will be anything but a Chevy. I grew up with Chevy but now I feel they don’t know how to build the car of the future.
 

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Even though GM seems to have the battery issue resolved for 2020 and above their foresight into EV technology is seriously lacking.
GM's answer is Ultium. We will have to wait and see just how good it is, but I think GM's foresight is there. Granted, there are several "right now" problems to worry about, too.
 

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Even though GM seems to have the battery issue resolved for 2020 and above their foresight into EV technology is seriously lacking. They’ve had the Bolt EV out for 5 years and VERY little has changed. The rate of charge is dismal compared to Tesla. And of course I am going to compare any EV against Tesla as IMHO it’s the Gold Standard. Tesla now can charge at 250kW. Amazing!
They didn’t fix the battery issue and I have not received any notice as to reducing charge back to 90% or anything else to tell me they are looking into it.
Of course ICE cars have caught fire. Normally though they are running. If they are running then the owner is nearby. Not sure how many ICE owners park their vehicles in their garages and leave them running. The point is my car is plugged in and charging while I sleep. I have a garage to protect my car from the weather and to keep it warmer for state of charge. If I want to feel comfortable I need to park outside if I want to charge to 100%.
Next vehicle will be anything but a Chevy. I grew up with Chevy but now I feel they don’t know how to build the car of the future.
Oh give me a break, Tesla the gold standard? My neighbor had the main screen go out on his model 3 almost a month ago and still has not been able to get it replace. He is able to dive it with basically no operator controls. No speedometer, no AC.... Nothing that you need the center screen for.

I am being more pragmatic about charging speed since right now most DC chargers are less than 62.5 kW. All the new ones are. This does not make me happy but frankly this is 100% better than no DCFC's The Bolt EV is also available at a decent price. This is quite important to me too. I don't place all that much importance of DCFC rate so the Bolt EV is still the best on the road as far as I am concerned! Just my 2 cents worth!
 

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I would not buy another Bolt, but my reason does not have to do with the fires. My Bolt has 97K miles on it and has not burned yet, so not likely to have a manufacturing defect.

My reasons for not wanting another one are range and charging speed. Since I bought the Bolt back in 2017, technology has advanced and range is up as well as charging speeds. But the new Bolts have not advanced at all.(n) I just bought a Mach E with 305 mile range and a decent charge rate out to 80%. On my first road trip I was able to add 161 miles of range in 25 minutes, peak charging rate was 160KW and it stayed above 80KW until 80% SoC.(y)
It will be interesting to see how that fast a charge rate will degrade battery overtime... but that is good stuff for sure!!!
 

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Tesla as IMHO it’s the Gold Standard. Tesla now can charge at 250kW. Amazing!
The new Hummer EV will charge at 350KW, that is the new upcoming gold standard. Super amazing!

And the Taycan is already at 270Kw. Both of these vehicles are using 800V systems, Tesla needs to change or will lose the charging speed race.
 
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