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The GOM offers an algorithmic analysis of a user's driving habits. Not sure yet what to think about this. Might be more concerned if finding my driving habits have been used to create a user profile that is sold to third parties.
Unfortunately, you spent a year in the "unknown" while if you would have read the Owners Manual you'd have had the answer from the first day of ownership of your Bolt EV.
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Is it possible like on the Mach-E to reset driver habits to none?
Yes. Just press on the ✅ button on your steering wheel before you start driving. It will reset the Average/Distance in the DIC but it will keep the GOM numbers you had before. Once you start driving, the numbers on GOM will start to change, based on the present driving conditions and HVAC settings you use in this trip. Your GOM will become this way pretty much spot on for your daily driving. As long as you understand what GOM is, you'll know when to look at it and when to disregard it.
 

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IMO, this is the right way to look at your car! And to some extent I think GM failed with the UI. But I think a lot about EVs will eventually become conventional car wisdom... you know, like the knowledge we take for granted about gas cars (oil changes, octane, etc...).
This will happen when the DCFC infrastructure will be wide spread in the country and most important, reliable. Until then, people should learn what their car tells them so that they don't look like fools stranded on the road 0.5 miles away from the DCFC station. My $0.02
 

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EDIT: It's funny you mention the "fools" stranded on the road. Two of our most experienced Bolt forum members ended up stranded on the road... because the GOM UI sucks.
Define most experienced. For me, Eric Way is the most experienced Bolt EV driver. And I learned a lot from him, I admit it. In fact he’s the reason I decided to change my Volt for the Bolt EV in 2018, because he showed me what the car can do. I don’t remember him being stranded on the road because of the GOM or anything else.

I drove my Bolt EV for 4 years already in -25C and +35C degrees and NEVER was left stranded on the road. And yes, I like to go 10% SOC or bellow. But it’s true, I know my car and what can it do. I also know what GOM is.

The only situation I would see myself stranded on the road would be because I arrived to a DCFC station that is not functioning. Not because I didn’t read the GOM right. People don't understand that the numbers on the left of the DIC are not everything and that you have all you need in front of your eyes to avoid a situation where you are forced to stop on the road because you have no more electrons in the battery.
 

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…But if you're constantly tempting fate below 10% then the difference between a blinking single bar and a real number like 3.53% is going to be like night and day. Thanks to that I've been able to drive to the charger at the destination with less than 2% of battery left multiple times without getting stranded. I certainly don't condone this to others... but information helps, that's all I'm saying.
MyChevrolet app does this for me. I confess, I pay for it a monthly fee, but hey, my money, my choice. Although it's not really necessary and sometimes is useless when you are in the middle of nowhere with no cell signal.

And let’s face it, most people wouldn’t know what to do even with the numbers of % SOC right in their face. That’s why they find themselves clueless when there are no more numbers in the GOM. And that’s a reality, don't make it personal.

P.S. You can see the GOM numbers even after the Low shows up. Just stop the car and start it again.
 

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Imagine needing to read a manual to use GUI-based computer software... like Windows or Office. It's unheard of.
Maybe for you, but when I want to use Office to the full extent of its capabilities, I do read the manual (the Help at least). Yes, to use it for writing a text, you don’t need much, you just type. or when you want to add some numbers is pretty simple. But when you want to make functions or choice boxes, well, you start to read the manual. As the GOM is. You use to stop and charge @ 10% SOC or above, you don’t need much, it’s good enough. You want to go lower, well, you need to learn some more about it.
 

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It's more complicated than you car's dashboard gages! Or it's supposed to be! The difference is that Microsoft is a company that knows how to write software and UIs -- so that even a toddler or old person can just pick things up and start using them -- and GM is a car company who can't write software to save themselves.
You chose to compare the two…
 

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Yes... because Microsoft writes more complicated software that requires no manual to use their software. Yet the GOM -- for even basic usage! -- you have to read a manual or a sticky thread or a number of facebook posts or reddit posts or post on chevybolt.org or do some math or watch YouTube to understand why your car is not working the way it should.
Thanks GOD for Microsoft writing software, because it helps me being payed big money ! You do know the "don’t panic before reboot" mantra, right ? SQL and objectSID vs SIDHistory is one of their idiotic things they do.
 

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Oh, I see how you read it. You read it the wrong. The GOM is being made more complicated than a word processor.
I see now what you are saying. For me the GOM is all you see in the DIC. Not only the numbers in the left. The GOM is also :
  • the average number
  • the battery gauge (in 5% increments)
  • the trend lines
  • the instant kW used
 

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GM, IMO, was the smartest of the bunch who made a GOM suited for all kind of people. They are the only company who presents an "enhanced" version of GOM, while everyone else is showing only a number and a %SOC.

IMO some people aren’t used to complicated things, so they should use the "Normal" mode: read the number and be done with it. And they should remember that when the battery gauge becomes orange, they should start looking to charge soon.

There are other people who understand the "enhanced" mode. Those should use it to its extent, because it has a lot of information.

BTW, go check the other EV (not BoLT EV) sites and you’ll see why the term "Guess-O-Meter" was invented.
 

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Only way you get to destination having deviated from that figure is if you accelerate like a crazy person at every light resulting in excess energy usage (or potentially if you drive to the mountain and encounter a 50 degree drop in temperature).
This is true when in California. Not in Canada, in winter. Driving a Tesla in winter here means the estimated % SOC at arrival is 15-20% more optimistic than the reality. No need to drive like crazy or see a difference in temperature between the start and the end of the trip. Although this could very well happen and Tesla GOM sucks big time like every one else in these conditions.
 

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Apologies to those who would condemn me for not wanting a social relationship with my car or wanting to know much about it unless required.
You do know that a social relationship with a car is viewed as a blasphemy, right ? So why would you think someone would condemn you ? Continue using your car as you did in the last year and be done with it. My $0.02

P.S. Although it does seem you want to know more about the GOM, which has nothing to do with the relation mentioned above. Oh well, I hope you had your answer in the other thread that opened your eyes (and mind). What do you know !?! People learn something new every day, even when they don't expect and no matter the age.
 

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When in the morning we get into an ICE car and the fuel gauge says "full" we know there is gas in the tank up to the maximum the tank can hold.

When we get in an EV in the morning after charging all night and it tells us, based on driver habits, we only have three-fourths or less of "full range," it is not the same thing as a full tank of gas.
There is a problem with the exemple above. Why ? Here is why :
  • When you get in your ICEV, the car fuel gauge says full. Full stop. Nothing about the miles you’ll be driving on that full tank. But, from my experience with an ICEV, the range is never the same. Because of the driving conditions, the road conditions, weather and so on.
  • When you get in your EV, the battery gauge says also full but you also see a new information vs ICEV : how many miles you could drive based on the past driving conditions, weather etc. Same as the ICEV but now you have a number in front of you.

So, IMO, there is nothing different between the ICEV and the BEV, it’s only the disconnection between the two types of cars in the minds of the new BEV owners. They expect their BEV to always drive the EPA rating while they don’t expect the same from their ICEV. I can’t understand why, but maybe because there is a lack of information from before they bought their BEV.
 

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These were users like p7wang who have had their Bolts for years.
I don't mean to disrespect either of them, but if people have their Bolt for eons (not years) and all they did was use it mainly in trips around the house (never or almost never exceeding its range), it doesn't make them experts in how GOM works.
 

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Someone had their battery replaced (before recall) and had very low GOM estimates. The advice of an anonymous facebook commenter was to discharge the battery a lot and recharge it to 100% a few times. And that fixed it for this unfortunate user.
Almost right, but not exactly.
The process is to discharge the battery bellow 50% SOC and let it sit unplugged for 2 hours. Then charge it to 100% SOC and let is sit for 2 hours again. This way the battery capacity relearn process is forced to execute.
 

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One of the bad things about the Bolt's GOM is that even if you do understand some physics, there are elements of information that contradict each other. If the DIC shows you one efficiency average and the GOM shows you one prediction and you do some math, they don't agree in general. Isn't that ironic? Someone smart enough to do the math and physics calculations can be left just as confused as someone who doesn't know any of the math. It's bad for the super intelligent and the super dumb. Of course, yes... the GOM, infotainment energy statistics and DIC are all separate systems (but you don't know that initially).
Someone smart enough would have learned already that the numbers in the DIC the morning before the start of a new trip mean nothing much, especially if the trip involves highway driving and the car usage yesterday was city driving.
As the book shows it, the range in the GOM is a prediction of what you can drive before empty based on the past driving conditions. Once you understood that, you are on the right path to enlightenment.

As I said it so many times, I almost lost count, the GOM will start to show the real numbers after about 25 miles of consistent driving (meaning you drive at a set speed, aka, after 25 miles on the highway). And these numbers will change based on the driving conditions (road elevation, wind, speed, tire pressure, road surface etc). You have the average in the DIC, you have the %SOC in 5% increments, you do what you want with these informations. Those "experts" you talk about, missed the last part and got stranded on the road. This tells me they aren't that "experts" as you call them, no disrespect to them though. I am sure they themselves wouldn't call themselves experts either.
 

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Tesla literally uses temperature data and even change of elevation in the data used to compute the range and SOC on arrival at a destination. This article dates back to 2019 and already talks about it. For more current info, Tesla's owner's manual goes into quite a bit of detail as to what goes into the calculations.

In short, Tesla is using environmental data to inform how it calculates range and predicted SOC, so those living in super cold climates, like in Canada, will see that incorporated in the data presented to them with very strong accuracy.

Do not get me wrong, I'm not a Tesla fan boy who thinks that Elon does no wrong (because yes, I know that's what will be interpreted), but I do think range calculations and accuracy between Tesla and the rest of the EV market are two different worlds entirely. After 5 years in a Bolt, and after skepticism when I took delivery of my Model Y, I'm massively impressed with the technology in this vehicle and how much simpler it makes EV adoption for a novice (here I'm specifically referring to accuracy of range calculations and onboard navigation including charging stops).

For those who don't wish to click on the Tesla URL:

" When navigating to a destination, Model 3 helps you anticipate your charging needs by calculating the amount of energy that remains when you reach your destination. When navigating, the map displays this calculation next to the Battery icon on the turn-by-turn direction list (see Navigating to a Destination). When the turn-by-turn direction list is compressed, touch the top of the list to expand it.

The calculation that predicts how much energy you will use is an estimate based on driving style (predicted speed, etc.) and environmental factors (elevation changes, wind speed and direction, ambient and forecasted temperatures, air density and humidity, etc.). As you drive, Model 3 continuously learns how much energy it uses, resulting in improved accuracy over time. It is important to note that Model 3 predicts energy usage based on the driving style of the individual vehicle. For example, if you drive aggressively for a period of time, future range predictions will assume higher consumption. Also, if you purchase a used Tesla vehicle, it is recommended that you perform a factory reset (Controls > Service > Factory Reset) to ensure the predicted energy is as accurate as possible."
P.S. All the above is done also by the MyChevrolet app.
 
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