Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
2020 Bolt LT
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This popped up in my news feed.
Can't help but to to ask: any funny things we could post about it?
I will start.
when the boat catches on fire, there is plenty of water to put it out, all you have to do is sink it!
"911 can what is your emergency?"
Help! ... my boat is on fire, help! ...
Dispatcher": yes sir, we are aware of it, there is a recall, the best to do is sink it"
:)

GM Gets Into Electric Boating, Buys Stake in Pure Watercraft

https://jalopnik.com/the-ev-boat-company-that-gm-just-bought-into-looks-pret-1848111265
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
986 Posts
Great idea but it better be well insulated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,213 Posts
I ask about jetskis since I don't intend to own a boat... and my stand up ski was stolen a few years back, and I'd like to replace it. Never did any maintenance to it except adjust the idle speed for the couple years I owned it... I hope the throttle stuck and the boat exploded the first time the thief took it out.
 

·
Registered
2020 Bolt LT
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I wonder if an electric jetski is feasible?

These look interesting;

Board | Foil
I would say not with the current battery technology.
Unless it is a short-range ski.
This Yamaha that we have has a (20 gallon), larger gas tank than my honda civic. And it guzzles fuel like no tomorrow. It's the mid-size engine 1.0L 3 cylinder (looks sounds and smells like a Yamaha street bike engine) but tuned to be happy and rev btw 6-8K RPM, all the time.
Edit: come to think of it, 6-8K RPM is a happy mid rev range for a typical inline 3-4 cyl DOHC engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,213 Posts
Boating is way more energy intensive than driving/flying because water is such a dense medium to push through. I don't see EV boating catching on too soon, though there is a good use case for things like ferrys and other short range use cases.

The local reservoir only allows electric motors... which got me to thinking :sneaky:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Boating is way more energy intensive than driving/flying because water is such a dense medium to push through. I don't see EV boating catching on too soon, though there is a good use case for things like ferrys and other short range use cases.
That depends how fast you want to push through the water and for how long. Electric boats would work well for the people who spend 30 minutes at high speed and the rest of the day fishing, or those who spend an hour wakeboarding and then head back to the dock. Ferries with short crossings and little traffic would work well, but longer routes where ferries are on their way back as soon as they can unload and load would need really powerful charging to keep up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
That depends how fast you want to push through the water and for how long. Electric boats would work well for the people who spend 30 minutes at high speed and the rest of the day fishing, or those who spend an hour wakeboarding and then head back to the dock. Ferries with short crossings and little traffic would work well, but longer routes where ferries are on their way back as soon as they can unload and load would need really powerful charging to keep up.
There is already a pretty large/busy ferry in service in Norway: https://www.electrive.com/2021/03/02/worlds-largest-electric-ferry-yet-goes-into-service-in-norway/

The article claims 9mW charging.
 

·
Registered
2020 Bolt LT
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What would make a boat owner choose electric at this pointing time, fuel cost savings, maintenance cost?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
What would make a boat owner choose electric at this pointing time, fuel cost savings, maintenance cost?
Here are the specs:
  • Horsepower: 50 horsepower equivalent, but because of its light weight can be configured to be suitable for hulls rated for a 25 to 50HP
  • Weight: 112lbs
  • Water Resistance: IPX7
  • Voltage: 350V
  • Propeller Top RPM: 1500RPM
  • Propeller: 16″ diameter 3-blade propeller
  • Motor: 25 kW continuous power PMAC motor, passively cooled underwater in line with propeller
  • Integrated power trim/tilt
  • System pricing: $16,500, comprised of Outboard Motor (includes throttle, mobile app and cables) – $6,000; Charger – $2,000; Battery Pack – $8,500 (9KWH)
I'll leave it to the boaters to figure out what would make it economical vs. a 50 hp ICE outboard for 1/2 the money.
 

·
Registered
2020 Bolt LT
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here are the specs:
  • Horsepower: 50 horsepower equivalent, but because of its light weight can be configured to be suitable for hulls rated for a 25 to 50HP
  • Weight: 112lbs
  • Water Resistance: IPX7
  • Voltage: 350V
  • Propeller Top RPM: 1500RPM
  • Propeller: 16″ diameter 3-blade propeller
  • Motor: 25 kW continuous power PMAC motor, passively cooled underwater in line with propeller
  • Integrated power trim/tilt
  • System pricing: $16,500, comprised of Outboard Motor (includes throttle, mobile app and cables) – $6,000; Charger – $2,000; Battery Pack – $8,500 (9KWH)
I'll leave it to the boaters to figure out what would make it economical vs. a 50 hp ICE outboard for 1/2 the money.
charger $2000?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Obviously the price will need to come down and the battery will need to get much larger before it is practical for most users.

With such a big, slow turning prop it would seem to be targeted at large displacement boats rather than small planing hulls. A typical 25 hp outboard spins a 10 inch prop at 2500-3000 rpm.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top