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Yes, I too have spare tire anxiety (vs range anxiety).
:0)


I travel about 200 miles per day in the rural high desert and me (being the most lucky driver out there) in other vehicles have cut tires on sharp rocks, put nails in my sidewall, bent rims on rocky dirt roads and you name it. I'd feel a heck of a lot more comfortable with a spare even if I had to put it in the front passenger seat.
:0)
 

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Well now you know a spare would fit perfectly in the trunk's false floor compartment. I've always had a spare tire too and with how much construction the roads are under every winter, nails lying around are just perfect for puncturing tires.

Seems like drivers will always have some kind of anxiety. :D
 

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For others who do want the spare tire option, in addition to the provided "no-spare" equipment Chevrolet offers, I have a donut spare, scissors jack, lug wrench that all fit nicely under the luggage compartment false floor for the times when I was driving some distance out of town.

So, approx $200 later, I have an actual donut spare tire. Fit tested on my Left Front tire position to make sure clearances were all good and the factory tire wheel lugs fit as well.

I'd posted all the wheel, tire size information under Oldskybolt a couple weeks ago. Check it out and I hope this helps.
 

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Always use the factory tires on the front, even if you are forced to move one from the rear and install the spare on the rear. Overall tire size can differ widely from the factory tire, to the spare being used. You don't want different speed inputs going into the axle/transmission. It's the same, only backwards on a rear drive car especially if it has a limited slip.

You can burn it up and cause lots of damage with two different sized tires
on the same drive axle :eek:
 

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Always use the factory tires on the front, even if you are forced to move one from the rear and install the spare on the rear. Overall tire size can differ widely from the factory tire, to the spare being used. You don't want different speed inputs going into the axle/transmission. It's the same, only backwards on a rear drive car especially if it has a limited slip.

You can burn it up and cause lots of damage with two different sized tires
on the same drive axle :eek:
Very true. Both front tires need to be the same. It sounds like there might be enough room in the trunk to hold the Bolt rim and tire as a spare. Likely there are some folks that would sell their factory rims and tires as they put aftermarket stuff on.
 

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Very true. Both front tires need to be the same. It sounds like there might be enough room in the trunk to hold the Bolt rim and tire as a spare. Likely there are some folks that would sell their factory rims and tires as they put aftermarket stuff on.
You can use a compact spare. Just make sure the oddball is in the rear.
If you get a flat on the front, move one from the rear to the front and put the compact tire
on the rear. Easy :nerd:
 

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Alright... my commute is mostly freeway and a flat would really stink.

I've been researching this and have bought all the parts needed for a spare tire kit for my Bolt.

One thing that made me uneasy was the standard Cruze or Sonic Jack. The Bolt doesn't have designated pinch weld sections for these types of jacks. I feel uneasy to jack it up at the pinch weld knowing that my car weighs 4514 lbs.

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

The lift points for this vehicle are these metal areas under the car with round alignment holes that remind me of those for a Pontiac Solstice or even the C4 / C5 Corvette:

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

After doing a little bit of research, I came up with this jack:

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

It's from a Chevy S10 pickup. It's also used for the Chevy Blazer. The protruding dimple fits the alignment holes under the Bolt perfectly:

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

Since the jack has a bigger base and is rated for a higher weight than the Cruze jack, I feel a little bit more at ease about using it.

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

Now I need to figure out how to store the spare tire, jack and the lug nut tool. I have the Bose sub and amp taking up the space the spare tire normally goes. I don't think I want to give up any more cargo space. I need to play around with it. I'll post up what I end up with.
 

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Now I need to figure out how to store the spare tire, jack and the lug nut tool. I have the Bose sub and amp taking up the space the spare tire normally goes.
The "wheel well" that the Bose sub and amp are installed in isn't completely circular - it has a flat section at the back. Because of that, I think you'll find that there isn't enough fore-aft room down there to put a spare even if you removed the Bose equipment.

My thought, not having actually bought a Bolt yet, is that the spare tire, jack, and other miscellaneous equipment might fit below the false cargo floor - the one that brings the cargo compartment loading height up to match the height of the back seats when they're folded down.
 

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The spare does fit under the false floor but not in the round cubby hole that would logically be where a spare goes.

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

I put the jack and tools in a backpack.

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

Then the backpack on top of the spare.

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

Cargo floor back on and the Rola organizer on top.

Untitled by tk_1971, on Flickr

Yep, I lost some space, but gained a little piece of mind.
 

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In case your kit doesn't have a tire pressure gauge and air pump, it will be a good idea to keep those handy. Along with always checking the spare tire pressure (a couple times a month). Doing that will set you up perfectly for the worst of situations.

Often I had to help people with low air pressure spare tires, not fun.
 

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Thanks for the info on the spare...
How does it match up with the OEM tire diameter?
In case your kit doesn't have a tire pressure gauge and air pump, it will be a good idea to keep those handy. Along with always checking the spare tire pressure (a couple times a month). Doing that will set you up perfectly for the worst of situations.

Often I had to help people with low air pressure spare tires, not fun.
The spare has a 22.34" diameter while the stock tire has a 25.46" diameter. When used only at the rear, this should be fine.

I have a $25 Harbor Freight 12v compressor that fits in the spot dedicated to the GM inflator kit. Need to remove the HF compressor out of the zippered storage bag to fit but it has a built in gauge.

https://m.harborfreight.com/12v-100-psi-high-volume-air-compressor-69284.html
 
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